Day of The Goat

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  I’ve been enjoying the latest Internet trend of the “goat” versions of songs.  (For those that haven’t seen them, a snippet of a pop song or even an operatic piece is embellished with a clip of a screaming goat filling in for a vocal part.  One of the more popular goats used is actually a sheep, but we’ll let that slide.)  This got me thinking to back in the early ‘00s and the late ‘90’s when I helped on a few projects to develop entertaining web content.  Back then everybody was wondering what the Internet’s “Uncle Milty” would be. (This is in reference to “The Milton Berle Show” which is given credit for solidifying the role of television in the American home.)  Little did we know our “Uncle Milty” was already here; he was that chimpanzee that drank his own pee right from the tap.  Remember him?  Of course you do!  Everyone saw that loveable, curious, or possibly just really thirsty little guy.  Even if you didn’t have a computer or Internet access at the time you found somebody who did and you watched the ape drink the pee, or the guy fall on his face trying a back-flip, or the baby shoot a cloud of baby powder out it’s butt.

What does this say about us as a society?  Have we downgraded ourselves from a culture that comes together to watch an artist practice his craft to a bunch of belly-scratching gawkers who want thirty second clips of animals and babies being themselves and grown adults doing stupid shit?  I don’t think so.  Milton Berle attracted most of his audience by wearing dresses on TV.  The sheer randomness of what type of videos go viral makes me think we’ve come full circle and rely on each other for entertainment like our grandparents did, only this time we can do it on a global scale.  Today, you’re watching someone take a nut shot on YouTube tomorrow millions of people may be watching you take an unsuspected nut shot.  Maybe that’s what Occultist Alistair Crowley meant when he said “Every man and every woman is a star.”

Ed Furman is a Second City alumni and a co-founder of the Annoyance Theater. He is a playwright and co-authored the hits Co-ed Prison Slutsand Rod Blagojevich: Superstar.

 

Ed Furman is a Second City alumni and a co-founder of the Annoyance Theater. He is a playwright and co-authored the hits Co-ed Prison Slutsand Rod Blagojevich: Superstar.

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